Improving Academic Performance

Is Online College Now the Right Option?

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Mon, Apr 06, 2020 @ 04:14 PM

Choosing a college isn't easy, especially if you don't want your college experience to lock you into one place. And, now we have the Coronavirus to consider. If you are already in a traditional on campus college, but aren't necessarily loving the experience, it could be the right time to consider studying online. If you are thinking about returning to school and were already pondering an online university as an option, the pandemic makes online college an even more appropriate choice. 

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How Online Tutoring Works

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Mon, Apr 06, 2020 @ 09:00 AM

In a previous article, we scanned the distance learning landscape and explained how online tutoring can help parents and students navigate it.

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Tags: online tutoring, online tutors, working with an online tutor, online educational resources, coronavirus, distance learning, remote learning, online classroom

A Guide to Distance Learning (and How Online Tutoring Helps)

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Mon, Mar 30, 2020 @ 03:24 PM

As a result of Covid-19, we're all living in a strange and unsettling new reality, and none of us knows exactly how long things are going to continue like this. While all of us are experiencing and dealing with the situation in our own ways, students across the country and around the globe have a particularly new set of circumstances with which to contend, and they, as well as schools, teachers, parents, administrators, tutors—every single one of us involved in education—need to learn ways to adapt. 

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Tags: online tutoring, online tutors, working with an online tutor, online educational resources, coronavirus, distance learning

How Online Tutoring and E-Learning Can Help Beat the Coronavirus

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Wed, Mar 18, 2020 @ 02:44 PM

The world today is not the same as the world we lived in two months or even two weeks ago. The global pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus (aka COVID-19) has completely disrupted all economic and social life, and its true effects are only just beginning to be felt. We are all entering a time of uncertainty such as none of us have faced before, as individuals or as a collective. As the virus infects more and more of the global population, greater numbers of people are going to be forced into isolation within their homes, having their work-lives transformed or completely shut down. What are we going to do? How should we be spending all the extra energy and time many of us will now have, but which none of us asked for?

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Tags: online tutoring, online tutors, working with an online tutor, online educational resources, online gmat tutor, online GRE tutoring, online LSAT tutoring, grad school online, coronavirus

Five Private High School Application Mistakes

Posted by David Mainiero, InGenius Prep on Fri, Jan 03, 2020 @ 11:56 AM

If you’re applying to private high schools soon, you need to plan the months you’ve got ahead of you. The admissions process is very competitive, and you have to make sure you’re on top of your game every step of the way. While there are definite protocols to follow such as reading the application instructions carefully and going through multiple drafts of your essays, there are also some don’ts to keep in mind. Take a look at 5 mistakes to stray away from throughout your private high school application journey.

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Tags: motivation, improve academic performance, college prep, improving grades, college student, high school, private high school, CPS selective enrollment, high school admissions

Physical Wellness: An Underappreciated Key to Improving Performance on Tests

Posted by Dr. Kenya Grooms, MacCormac College on Fri, Jul 19, 2019 @ 10:38 AM

No matter how confident you may feel, final exams can still cause a great deal of anxiety. For many students, the pressure builds even if the understanding of the material is thorough. In more extreme cases, you might begin to doubt yourself, lose sleep and fail to remember the information you studied so hard to learn.

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Tags: motivation, improve academic performance, college prep, improving grades, college student, high school, physical wellness, health and academic performance, healthy living for students

How to Improve Performance in High School & College: 5 Basic Strategies

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Fri, May 10, 2019 @ 11:55 AM

We are a tutoring company, and as such parents and students tend to seek us out when they realize some extra 1-1 help is needed to perform well in an academic class or on a standardized test. However, using a private tutor is just one way to improve your academic performance. In this article, we’ll explore other, perhaps sometimes obvious yet too often ignored or neglected, strategies to try before investing in private tutoring.

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Tags: motivation, improve academic performance, college prep, improving grades, college student, high school

Podcasts for Students Series: Introduction

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Thu, Dec 27, 2018 @ 10:09 AM

In this series of blog posts, we’ll explore how podcasts can help students improve their academic performance and prepare for successful careers. We all know effectively managing your time is a key component of performing well at work and in school, and podcasts are an excellent way to learn new things while you are exercising, walking to class, or on the bus. Podcasts obviously cover a wide range of topics. Apple’s “categories” of podcasts include: arts, business, comedy, education, games, government, health, kids and family, music, news and politics, religion, science and medicine, society and culture, sports, technology, and TV/film.

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Tags: podcast, growth mindset, productivity, time management, improve academic performance, college student, undergraduate student, high school

How to Extract Maximum Value from Your College Major

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Fri, Dec 21, 2018 @ 09:33 AM

Despite the sneers of those around you, you went to college to study film history. Or, maybe you got a degree in literature or Urdu. While it’s good that you followed your passion, after graduation, it might seem that your parents and friends had a point. You’re having a tough time getting a job (or perhaps you are still choosing a college major, and this is a fear you have). In fact, there is too much worry and generalizing when it comes to choosing a major.  If you think strategically, you can follow your passions and launch a successful career.

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Tags: college student, undergraduate degree, undergraduate student, choosing a college major, college degree

Does Practice Make Perfect?

Posted by Nina Parrish, Parrish Learning Zone on Mon, Jun 04, 2018 @ 09:00 AM

We all know that in order to acquire a new skill we have to practice. Anytime we want to learn something new in school, it requires practice as well. However, some methods of practice are far more effective than others. Often what separates great from average in school, sports, and other endeavors is not just natural talent but how they practice.

Both quantity and quality of practice are important.

It is apparent that people who love to practice often eventually outperform those who don’t. In general, the more you practice, the better the outcome will be. A student who studies every day for several months for the SAT is going to do better than a student who starts studying a few days before the test. However, there is a limit on how much practice a person can do, and you don’t want to practice so much that you start to feel burnt out.

Getting good at something also depends on the quality of practice that you do. If you practice without knowing your specific needs for improvement, you are often ingraining the same mistakes you always make. Conversely, great performers in all areas practice deliberately. This means that they are constantly analyzing their performance looking for areas that need improvement. Quality practice works to improve performance because it builds up myelin sheath which insulates the axons that carry information in your brain. This allows information to travel more efficiently. Quality practice should have several characteristics:

1. Target weaknesses at the edge of your ability.

Make sure that you are not just practicing skills that you already know. When you practice, it should be right at the cusp of what you are already able to do and what you are trying to learn but not currently able to do. Practice should feel challenging, and it is a good idea to practice mixed skills instead of always focusing on one skill at a time. Students who practice the current skill they are learning along with previous skills do better on future tests because they must pair each skill with the proper procedure.

Sometimes it is helpful to have the honest feedback of a coach in sports or a teacher or tutor in academics to help analyze your performance and target skills to work on. Deliberate practice means breaking down the big thing you are learning into its parts. So, if you are taking a test, do a practice test and see which skills you are struggling with the most. Focus on learning those skills before taking the whole test again.

2. Focus on the task at hand by minimizing distractions.

We are constantly distracted by our cellphones, Facebook, and other social media. Place all cell phones in a place where you cannot see or hear them while studying. If you need to use your device for studying, use an app like Offtime  that blocks other programs and alerts for the time period that you are working.

3. Divide time into multiple daily practice sessions of limited duration.

Practice for short periods of time where you are completely focused, and then take a break. If you work for too long, you will start to feel fatigued and you won’t be able to retain as much. Practicing for long periods of time also leaves you much more prone to distractions.

4. Practice slowly and work up to the speed that you need.

Don’t worry about timing at first, worry about mastering the skill. Once you are able to perform the skill, then start practicing your timing.

5. Practice mentally between actual physical practice sessions.

When you are not practicing, think about what was challenging and mentally rehearse those skills. Chances are that the next time you attempt them, they will seem easier.

The old saying is that “practice makes perfect”.  However, it is not just quantity of practice that makes a difference. People who become successful at any skill focus on strategies to make sure that their time is filled with high-quality practice.

About the Author

Nina Parrish is a former special education teacher and a licensed school counselor. She is the owner of Parrish Learning Zone a K-12 tutoring company in Virginia. Her blog The Learning Zone publishes content on education and parenting topics.

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Tags: study skills, deliberate practice at school, deliberate practice, improving cognition, improving academic performance, tutoring skills, tutoring tips, improving grades