LSAT & Law School Blog

How to Choose a Law School: Deciding Where to Attend

Posted by Padya Paramita, InGenius Prep on Mon, Feb 03, 2020 @ 08:00 AM

If you’ve received offers of admission from multiple law schools, congratulations! While the more difficult part of the application process is out of the way, another big decision awaits you. Deciding where you end up going to law school could dictate the course of your career. Do you prefer getting your JD at a campus where the weather is warm year-round? Or do your priorities lie towards ensuring that your classrooms are divided into small sections for discussion? As you go over your acceptances and pick your favorites, consider the following factors when deciding how to choose a law school that is right for you.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Law School Admissions, Getting in to Law School, online LSAT tutoring, Choosing a law school, LSAT admissions

Follow These Three Steps for Basic LSAT Logical Reasoning Questions

Posted by Stefan Maisnier on Wed, Dec 05, 2018 @ 11:11 AM

While the LSAT Logical Reasoning section may seem to have an infinite number of potential scenarios and prompts, the vast majority of the problems found in the section follow basic rules governing argumentation that date back to the time of the Roman Empire. The key to succeeding on this section is following some consistent basic steps that will allow you to understand first what the question is asking you to do, second what the conclusion of the argument is, and lastly to predict what the answer should do to appropriately address the question task. This skill is the subject of today’s video tutorial with our Director of Online Tutoring – Stefan Maisnier.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning, LSAT practice problems, online LSAT tutoring

LSAT Tip of the Week: Analytical Reasoning Practice Problem #3

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, May 21, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week, we will focus on an example of how to setup an analytical reasoning (logic games) question. Our practice question will be from the June 2007 LSAT.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning, lsat analytical reasoning, LSAT practice problems

LSAT Tip of the Week: Analytical Reasoning Practice Problem #2

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, May 14, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week, we will focus on an example of how to setup an analytical reasoning (logic games) question. Our practice question will be from the June 2007 LSAT.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning, lsat analytical reasoning, LSAT practice problems

LSAT Tip of the Week: Analytical Reasoning Practice Problem #1

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, May 07, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week, we will focus on an example of how to setup an analytical reasoning (logic games) question. Our practice question will be from the June 2007 LSAT.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning, lsat analytical reasoning, LSAT practice problems

LSAT Tip of the Week: Logical Reasoning Practice Question #2

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Apr 30, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week, we will go over a practice problem from the Logical Reasoning Section of the June 2007 LSAT.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning

LSAT Tip of the Week: Logical Reasoning Practice Question #1

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Apr 23, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week, we will go over a practice problem from the Logical Reasoning Section of the June 2007 LSAT.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning

LSAT Tip of the Week: Non-Conditional Questions

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Apr 16, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

A common question type you will see for a logic game in the logical reasoning section will be non-conditional questions. Non-conditional questions can be viewed as the opposite of conditional questions and no new information will be set forth. So how do you tackle this question type? Well, since there is no new information you will have to depend on the information you already have as well as the inferences and diagrams you have already made. The question will either ask you for something that (1) must be true or (2) must be false/could be true. The former is straightforward, and you just need to find the answer choice that is always true, a good hint is to look at the inferences you already made. The latter is a bit more complicated. Here, you will have to play a game of elimination. Most likely you will have to check each rule given and see which answer choice violates a rule. Remember this general rule of thumb to differentiate the two non-conditional questions and you will save time on your approach and analysis. Read More

Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, improve my time on the LSAT, LSAT non conditional questions

LSAT Tip of the Week: Conditional Questions

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Apr 09, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

You may have heard that there are various types of questions for the logic games within the logical reasoning section of the LSAT. But what are these types and how do you spot them? This week we will focus in on conditional questions. What is a conditional question? It is usually one that adds in some new scenario using an if-statement. In order to tackle a conditional question, you usually will need to draw out a new diagram, as you have new information presented to you. The previous information you were originally given still does apply though, so make sure you incorporate the old with the new, unless the conditional question explicitly states not to. This question type is not hard to master at all and with a little practice can even become one of the easier question-types you face!  Read More

Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, improve my time on the LSAT, LSAT conditional questions

LSAT Tip of the Week: Improve Your Time on the Reading Comprehension Section

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Apr 02, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week we will focus on some general tips and tricks on how to attack the reading comprehension portion of the LSAT. This section can seem intimidating as the passages are lengthy and the time is minimal- this makes your plan of attack even more important. First, read the questions that follow the passage. Just skim over the stems so you know what you are looking for while reading. We will call this proactive reading. Now, while you are reading the passage do not just read- but understand. Highlight. Jot down key points and the author’s message. It is important to keep these brief and not include details, just find a specific process that works for you and stick to it. Once you have proactively read the passage, proceed to the questions. You know you properly grasped the passage and its contents when you find yourself being able to answer the general questions without having to refer to the passage. If this is something you do not feel like you can do, they you should go back and fix your way of approaching the passage. The only times you should really refer back to the passage is on the questions that provide you with additional information or facts. By keeping this method in mind and working on it until you perfect it, you will find yourself breezing through the reading comprehension section. Read More

Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat reading comprehension, improve my time on the LSAT