Improving Academic Performance

How Children Succeed: Part Two

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Wed, Dec 07, 2016 @ 07:29 PM


In part one of this three-part introduction to How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character we are introduced the main theme of the book, that grit and character, not intelligence, is what drives academic performance and helps children succeed. We left off with the introduction of the cognitive hypothesis.

Read More

Tags: Success requires more than intelligence, Grit drives academic performance

Focus: The New Key to Academic and Professional Success

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Fri, Dec 02, 2016 @ 01:32 PM


I just finished listening to a great podcast episode from Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman’s Psychology Podcast (one of my favorite podcasts because it’s generally, entertaining, informative and practical as it relates to helping you better understand the world around you) about the concept of Deep Work.

Read More

Tags: deliberate practice, focus, deep work

How Children Succeed: Part one

Posted by Lisa Alvarado on Wed, Nov 30, 2016 @ 10:00 AM


This is the first of a three-part introduction to Paul Toughs insightful book,  How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character.
 
The ultra-concise executive summary and key takeaway is that children do not succeed academically because of their innate intelligence, as is commonly assumed. Instead, Tough shares reams of research which suggests character traits like curiosity, grit, and the ability to persevere may be more important to long term academic success, and particularly success in college and life beyond college, than cognitive skills like mathematics, logic, and reading comprehension. The rest of this three-part article will introduce the author, explain the structure of the book, provide an overview of the book's introductory chapter, and offer a brief analysis/review of the book.
 
Let’s start by providing some details on the author. 
 
Tough is a journalist with a specific interest in education, child
development, and poverty in America. He's written cover stories for the New York Times Magazine, and his writing has also
appeared in Slate, GQ, and Esquire. It's interesting to note that you don't find out until the final chapter that Tough himself
was admitted to Columbia University, but ultimately dropped out before earning a college degree. In that final chapter, Tough ponders whether he lacks some of the critical character traits he describes in the book.
Read More

Tags: academic performance, beyond booksmart, hard work, Paul Tough

How 1% improvement can turn an F into an A

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Wed, Nov 23, 2016 @ 11:00 AM


Most students don’t realize how small, incremental improvements can accumulate over time to create significant jumps in skill level or academic performance.

Let’s begin by exploring some theories about performance and success that have a lot to do with becoming comfortable struggling and striving to make small improvements. Later, we’ll show how a seemingly small improvement of just 1% a week can turn an F into an A.

Read More

Tags: academic performance, growth mindset, studying, math skills

Making the Most of Summer

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Sun, Jul 24, 2016 @ 03:37 PM

 

Read More

Tags: increase your academic performance

Mindfulness as a Vehicle for Improving Cognition & Reducing Stress

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Wed, Jul 20, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

There’s been a lot of talk recently (in certain psychology or educational circles, at least) on the topic of mindfulness practice and its various benefits. What was once a feature of eastern philosophy/religion has grown into an increasingly Western and somewhat mainstream activity. Two of the most potentially powerful benefits of mindfulness practice include cognitive enhancement and stress-reduction. As a result, mindfulness has started to be implemented in school systems and curricula worldwide. But what is the practice of mindfulness, just how effective is it, and how can we reap the benefits by incorporating mindfulness into our lives? .

“Mindfulness can be defined as the psychological capacity to stay willfully present with one's experiences, with a non-judgmental or accepting attitude, engendering a warm and friendly openness and curiosity” (Kabat-Zinn, 2005). This article explores the science behind mindfulness practice and its effects on academic performance and stress reduction along with a few helpful tips to incorporate mindfulness practice into your daily living.

Read More

Tags: mindfulness, improving cognition, reducing stress

Does Better Sleep Equal Better Grades?

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Wed, Jun 29, 2016 @ 05:00 PM

Just as the energizer bunny must recharge his batteries every now and then, humans must also take time to power down, rest and recharge for the following day. But just how important is it to get a full nights rest?

 

Could getting the right amount of sleep (which for many people nowadays means more sleep) beneficially affect academic performance? Indeed, this is exactly what much of the data shows. 

Read More

Tags: academic performance

Are you studying effectively? (For your learning style?)

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Wed, Jun 08, 2016 @ 10:00 AM


We’ve all heard someone say: “I’m not doing well in this class because I am a visual learner and all the professor does is give boring lectures.”

What does this really mean?

There are four Learning Styles; visual, auditory, reading/writing and kinesthetic. Understanding which one/s you fall into can prove beneficial in the development of study and retention skills. Though we may feel we identify with one type of learning over another, the following are undoubtedly study tips that can help us all- not just in studying for exams but in actually retaining the material we’ve learned beyond them.

Read More

Tags: auditory learners, learning styles, visual learners, kinisthetic learners

Improved Academic Performance through Better Nutrition

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Wed, May 25, 2016 @ 10:00 AM


Numerous new studies show a promising link between good nutrition and optimal academic performance.

So, let’s explore whether you should start drinking green smoothies and munching on kale chips to increase your likelihood of getting that ACT score or grade you want (to use a few examples of strategies we've encountered...).

Read More

Tags: academic performance, IQ, increase your academic performance, nutrition

Mental Contrasting: A Better Way to Think Positively

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Mon, Apr 04, 2016 @ 09:30 AM


Many self-help gurus tout the clear need to think positively to reach your goals.

The general line of thought is that whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right. Why? Because if you think you can’t, you won’t put in the planning and effort to actually accomplish the goal. On some level, this is in fact true.

However, there is a growing body of evidence that "pure" positive thinking can actually reduce the chances you reach a goal you’ve set for yourself. In this article, we’ll explore how this could be.

Read More

Tags: strategic study plan, goal setting, positive thinking, mental contrasting, strategic planning