GMAT & MBA Admissions Blog

GMAT Quant 101: Basic Facts & Concepts to Remember

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Thu, Jun 14, 2018 @ 08:00 AM

In our GMAT tutoring sessions, we constantly remind students that the GMAT is not a math test. Although there are some rules you need to know, doing well requires that you think in a structured yet flexible way and approach each question as a problem that needs to be solved strategically and creatively. Rote memorization of facts and formulas is not the answer. Building critical thinking skills is the path to a 700+ GMAT score. 

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Tags: GMAT quant, GMAT tutor, gmat tutoring, GMAT prep, GMAT resources, GMAT, GMAT score, MBA Admissions, deliberate practice, gmat test prep, gmat study skills, GMAT study guide

Three Simple Ways Deliberate Practice Will Improve Your GMAT Score

Posted by Mike S. on Wed, May 30, 2018 @ 09:00 AM

There’s a common myth about standardized tests, that they’re supposed to gauge how smart you are. Why else would MBA programs require all students take a GMAT? Don’t they need some easy way to figure out who’s smartest without reading through all of those pesky applications?

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Tags: GMAT prep, GMAT, MBA Admissions, deliberate practice, gmat test prep, gmat study skills

Use Problem Solving Efficiency to Achieve Problem Solving Success

Posted by Stefan Maisnier on Wed, May 16, 2018 @ 09:00 AM

Excelling at any skills-based endeavor demands an economy of motion where most mistake maximum effort for excellent execution. The GMAT is no different. Every Quantitative Problem Solving question has a litany of potential paths to a solution, and the successful GMAT student’s goal is to reach that solution in the fewest number of steps possible. The key is to take note of all the information provided in the proper order, consider what information may be hidden in the answer choices, and to then calculate for the desired information. This is the subject of today’s video tutorial with our Director of Online Tutoring – Stefan Maisnier.

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Tags: GMAT quant, GMAT prep, GMAT, MBA Admissions, gmat test prep, online gmat tutoring, GMAT online, gmat study skills

An Argument for Online GMAT Tutoring

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Mon, Dec 11, 2017 @ 08:04 AM

Let’s start with a brief exploration of online tutoring in general, before tackling the question of why and how to pursue online GMAT tutoring.

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Tags: GMAT help, gmat tutoring, GMAT prep, GMAT, online gmat tutoring, online gmat tutor, GMAT online

GMAT Question of the Day #343  - YES/NO Question

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Thu, May 18, 2017 @ 11:22 AM

This week's GMAT Question of the Day relates to question #343 from the Official Guide for GMAT Review, 2017. It is a typical AD/BCE, YES/NO Question.

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Tags: GMAT quant, GMAT prep

GMAT Question of the Day #311 - Data Sufficiency

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Thu, May 11, 2017 @ 11:22 AM

For today's GMAT Question of the Day, we have an AD/BCE Value Question, relating to question #311 from theOfficial Guide for GMAT Review, 2017. See below for a clear, step-by-step example and explanation.

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Tags: GMAT quant, GMAT prep

GMAT Question of the Day #116 - Reducing Unnecessary Calculation

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Thu, May 04, 2017 @ 11:22 AM

This blog post relates to question #116 from the Official Guide for GMAT Review, 2017.

What intimidates most students here, and sends them spiraling into a black hole of unnecessary calculation, is the first line of the table: 10.8% of 37. It’s not as bad as it looks, but we’ll come back to that…

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Tags: GMAT quant, GMAT prep

GMAT Question of the Day #114 - VIC (variables in choices)

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Thu, Apr 27, 2017 @ 11:22 AM

This blog post relates to question #114 from the Official Guide for GMAT Review, 2017.

This is a classic combined rate problem with a VIC (variables in choices) twist. The authors of the OG provide the straightforward algebraic solution, and, with the proper background in rates problems like this, you shouldn’t have any trouble understanding what they’re up to. However, VIC problems with only one or two variables are begging to be back-solved.

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Tags: GMAT quant, GMAT prep

GMAT Question of the Day

Posted by Lisa Alvarado on Mon, Jan 30, 2017 @ 10:00 AM

 

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Tags: GMAT quant, GMAT prep

Four Common GMAT Myths

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Fri, Nov 11, 2016 @ 04:58 PM

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." – Mark Twain
 
There are many misconceptions about the GMAT. Some are harmless, but others can impact a student’s ability to score well and reach their graduate school goals. Here are five common myths with which you should dispense quickly as you begin to prepare for the GMAT (for more information on the format of the GMAT, visit Peterson's.com).
 
Myth #1: The GMAT is by far the most important admissions criteria
 
It’s stressful to imagine that your entire dream of business school rests on one test. And, unfortunately, that stress can increase the chances of you performing poorly on that critical exam. Luckily, this just isn’t true.
 
Don’t get me wrong. The GMAT is very important. It’s one of the top criteria admission committees consider, and if you want to go to a top ten school, you probably absolutely have to score in the upper 600s to have a shot, and most likely need to have a 700+ score to have a strong shot. But note, a) I’m only talking about top ten schools right now and b) I did not write that you must score 760 to have a strong shot at getting in.
 
In general, MBA programs really DO look at undergraduate grades and classes, leadership qualities, business experience, community service, and perhaps most importantly, your rationale for attending and the ways in which you’ll contribute to their class. For example, I scored a 710 on the GMAT and was accepted at Kellogg, while my boss (who obviously had more experience) scored a 760 and did NOT get in. I can only imagine it had something to do with the story he told about wanting to go to business school.
 
Myth #2: The higher you score, the better your chances
 
As with most things in business (and life), strategy matters a lot. Many schools use the GMAT as a threshold of sorts. Once you pass the threshold, you reach diminishing returns quickly, because after the committee sees a GMAT score beyond that threshold, they being to look at other factors mentioned above. 
 
I see too many students targeting top schools wasting their time trying with all their might to go from a 730 to a 760, and unfortunately they are almost certainly wasting their time and money. A top business school doesn’t view a 730 all that much different from a 760. Now, if you are targeting a top 100 business school, and you have a horrible GPA, a 730 GMAT score might get you accepted. And, if you are targeting a top 10 program, a 790 GMAT score might be high enough to stand out. But it is SO hard to get a 790. If you are currently at a 730, you are almost certainly better off focusing on writing excellent essays and pulling together a great application.
 
Myth #3: The GMAT is a grueling math aptitude test.
 
If you haven’t been in a math class in a long time, it’s easy to take a cursory view of the GMAT and, since many English speaking students are more comfortable with GMAT-verbal, view the whole test as a giant math test. In fact, the math skills tested on the GMAT are mostly from grades 9 and 10 (high school), though you are expected to apply those skills in creative and strategic ways.
 
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Tags: GMAT prep, GMAT