LSAT & Law School Blog

LSAT Tip of the Week: Non-Conditional Questions

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Apr 16, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

A common question type you will see for a logic game in the logical reasoning section will be non-conditional questions. Non-conditional questions can be viewed as the opposite of conditional questions and no new information will be set forth. So how do you tackle this question type? Well, since there is no new information you will have to depend on the information you already have as well as the inferences and diagrams you have already made. The question will either ask you for something that (1) must be true or (2) must be false/could be true. The former is straightforward, and you just need to find the answer choice that is always true, a good hint is to look at the inferences you already made. The latter is a bit more complicated. Here, you will have to play a game of elimination. Most likely you will have to check each rule given and see which answer choice violates a rule. Remember this general rule of thumb to differentiate the two non-conditional questions and you will save time on your approach and analysis. Read More

Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, improve my time on the LSAT, LSAT non conditional questions

LSAT Tip of the Week: Conditional Questions

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Apr 09, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

You may have heard that there are various types of questions for the logic games within the logical reasoning section of the LSAT. But what are these types and how do you spot them? This week we will focus in on conditional questions. What is a conditional question? It is usually one that adds in some new scenario using an if-statement. In order to tackle a conditional question, you usually will need to draw out a new diagram, as you have new information presented to you. The previous information you were originally given still does apply though, so make sure you incorporate the old with the new, unless the conditional question explicitly states not to. This question type is not hard to master at all and with a little practice can even become one of the easier question-types you face!  Read More

Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, improve my time on the LSAT, LSAT conditional questions

LSAT Tip of the Week: Improve Your Time on the Reading Comprehension Section

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Apr 02, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week we will focus on some general tips and tricks on how to attack the reading comprehension portion of the LSAT. This section can seem intimidating as the passages are lengthy and the time is minimal- this makes your plan of attack even more important. First, read the questions that follow the passage. Just skim over the stems so you know what you are looking for while reading. We will call this proactive reading. Now, while you are reading the passage do not just read- but understand. Highlight. Jot down key points and the author’s message. It is important to keep these brief and not include details, just find a specific process that works for you and stick to it. Once you have proactively read the passage, proceed to the questions. You know you properly grasped the passage and its contents when you find yourself being able to answer the general questions without having to refer to the passage. If this is something you do not feel like you can do, they you should go back and fix your way of approaching the passage. The only times you should really refer back to the passage is on the questions that provide you with additional information or facts. By keeping this method in mind and working on it until you perfect it, you will find yourself breezing through the reading comprehension section. Read More

Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat reading comprehension, improve my time on the LSAT

LSAT Tip of the Week: Diagramming Logical Reasoning Arguments

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Mar 26, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week we will review how to diagram an argument in the logical reasoning section of the LSAT. You may have heard about diagramming logic games, but how would you diagram logical reasoning arguments? Well, it is pretty simple, and it will go a long way to helping you get to the correct answer. There are three things to look for in your argument. First, find what the argument is claiming or concluding. This will generally be something that is backed by some sort of fact (data/evidence). Next, locate what the argument is conveying. This message will always be true and ties into the conclusion that you found in the first step. Finally, find the evidence. The evidence backs up the first two steps and does not necessarily have to be numbers or data, it could come in any form. While diagramming in logic games entails drawing it out, here it could differ. It may help you to make small bullets points when you first start thinking about logical reasoning questions in this 3-step process, but try to train yourself to do this in your head. By automatically jumping to locating these three points of the question, you will be able to break the information apart and organize it in a manner that will help you find the correct answer in the smallest frame of time. Check out LawSchooli for some tips and examples. Read More

Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, improve my time on the LSAT

LSAT Tip of the Week: Improve Your Time

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Mar 19, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

This week, we will focus on how to improve your time on the analytical reasoning (logic games) section of the LSAT. You have probably heard the importance of diagramming, and improving your time ties back to improving your diagramming. If you need a refresher on diagramming, head to The LSAT Trainer for some techniques and check out Magoosh for some common rules that will help you diagram. Now, once you are caught up on the basics of diagramming, let’s bring you up to speed on how to be speedy. The first thing you should do once you have made your basic diagrams is make some inferences. What does this entail? Well, every fact given to you in the question is important so make note of it in your diagram and make it a new potential scenario. So, if the question says that X sits in the first seat and Y must sit next to X, then we know that Y has to sit in the second seat if he has a seat. So, make a note of this. There are usually 2-3 of these so look out for these “hidden” rules and make sure you include them in your diagram as the odds are that there will be a question about this “hidden” rule and this will save you 3-4 minutes easily. Imagine all the extra problems you can solve in that time! Read More

Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, improve my time on the LSAT

LSAT Tip of the Week: Reading Comprehension

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Mar 12, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

The Reading Comprehension section tests your ability to read and understand lengthy passages. In order to truly master this section, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, while you are reading make sure you are annotating as you go. These passages are long and full of minor details, and by taking notes as you read the passage you will save precious time while answering the questions. While annotating, develop a system that works for you- and stick to it. Personally, I would suggest circling or highlighting important concepts, words, or people. In addition, make a note of what each major paragraph entailed. By actively reading and making a few notes, you will be able to quickly and correctly answer each question. Just like the other sections in the LSAT, this section has various, reoccurring question types. 

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat reading comprehension

LSAT Tip of the Week: Three Types of Analytical Reasoning Questions

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Mar 05, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

There are three major types of Analytical Reasoning, or Logic Game, questions. These include sequencing, grouping, and matching games. This week we will talk about how to spot each type of question. Sequencing games are generally the most common, and you can spot these by generally looking for one set of variables. For example, there will be 7 runners and 7 places they could finish in. Note that there could be more variables, but this still constitutes as a sequencing question. Next, we have grouping games. Grouping games will also only have one set of variables, but here there are usually multiple places each variable can go. For example, there could be 10 people that need to be placed on 2 teams. Finally, we have matching games. Matching games differ as they usually have two sets of variables but there is no order to put them into. For example, you could have 6 people and 3 types of pets. Now that you know the major types of logic games, head to TestSherpa to see example problems and test your understanding!

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning, lsat logic games, lsat analytical reasoning, lsat sequencing

LSAT Tip of the Week: Logic Games & Diagramming

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Feb 26, 2018 @ 09:16 AM

The LSAT Analytical Reasoning, or Logic Games, can seem daunting if you walk in without a game plan. This week we will briefly discuss diagramming to give you a solid foundation on how to attack these questions. First, get comfortable with diagramming. There are many different ways to diagram, so try them all out and see which one works best for you - here is one by the LSAT Trainer. While you diagram, look for key phrases that will help you pull out rules. Magoosh does an excellent overview of different logic patterns and how to diagram them. The three major types of logic games are sequencing, grouping, and matching. Each of these will be diagrammed in its own way, so make sure you know how to approach each one. Once you tackle and master diagramming, you will see a drastic improvement on your logic games section.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning, lsat logic games, lsat diagramming, lsat analytical reasoning

LSAT Tip of the Week: Logical Reasoning Strategies

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Feb 19, 2018 @ 11:16 AM

The logical reasoning section can be one that you feel like you could only truly perfect if you had all of the time in the world. So, this week we will focus on time saving tips and tricks that will ensure that you get the best score possible. The first step is simple, just carefully read through the question. Before taking a look at the answer choices, try to come up with a possible answer in your head and maybe even quickly write it down. You can read a variety of scenarios on how to “pre-phrase” your answer on Powerscore. Once you have your pre-phrased answer, read through each answer choice. Since you pre-phrased your answer you know what you are looking for in the answer choices, so either in your head or on your exam say if the answer choice could be viable or not. Once you have eliminated any that are completely wrong, go back and carefully read the 2-3 options that may be correct and find the one that is the most accurate. Practice this technique and by the time your LSAT rolls around, you will be breezing through the logical reasoning section and can spend the extra time focusing on the harder questions.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning

LSAT Tip of the Week: The Logical Reasoning Section

Posted by Dhara Shah on Mon, Feb 12, 2018 @ 09:09 AM

In order to truly master the logical reasoning section on the LSAT you must first master the different types of questions that you may encounter. Learning to identify the question type will allow you to attack each problem in the most efficient manner. There are about seven reoccurring question types which include: flaw, assumption, inference, strengthen, weaken, paradox, and principle. You can read more about the frequency of each of these question types in this article on Magoosh. As stated in the article, the three types of questions you will encounter most frequently will be assumption, flaw, and inference questions- so we will spend some time highlighting these three this week. First, an assumption question will give you an argument that is missing an important component, and you must choose the answer choice that best fits in with the argument. You can find a detailed explanation and example on 7sage. Next, a flaw question is one in which there is not proper support between the premise and conclusion – AKA there is a “flaw” in the relationship between the two. You can find example questions and a detailed explanation on lawschooli. Finally, in an inference question you must choose the answer that is most supported.

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Tags: LSAT Test Prep, LSAT Prep, LSAT mindset, Getting in to Law School, lsat logical reasoning, lsat arguments section