MCAT & Medical School Admissions

5 Most Valuable Resources for Writing a Personal Statement

Posted by InGenius Prep on Tue, Nov 25, 2014 @ 14:11 PM

The college personal statement is an opportunity for a student to sell himself or herself in the application process. This purpose of this essay is to show the admissions office who you really are. What about you is different from other applicants? What does your perspective make you unique? What experiences have you had that will shape your college career? This essay should provide additional evidence of your intellectual and creative achievement.

As this is such an important part of the application, it’s important to do your research before you begin writing. Below is a list of valuable websites and resources to help you approach your personal statement:

  1. College Board is a mission-driven, not-for-profit website that aims to connect students to college success and academic opportunities. Each year, it helps millions of applicants prepare for a successful transition to college through various programs and services. For tips on personal statements and essays, check out Big Future by the College Board.
  2. College Confidential is a website designed to guide students and parents about the many aspects of the college admissions process and help them understand each stage of the process. The website has assembled an editorial team responsible in creating content and gathering helpful information about college admissions from the web. 
  3. College Essay Organizer is a website that gathers past and present essay questions from different colleges and universities in the US and shares them to aspiring college students to help them write impressive personal essays and statements. The website has been helping tens of thousands of students get into the colleges of their dreams for decades through the service it provides. 
  4. InGenius Prep is a website run by former admissions officers from the most competitive schools in the United States. It provides helpful advice, tips, and information about college application, passing standardized tests, interview preparations, and admissions requirement handling. Every year, InGenius Prep helps millions of applicants get into their dream colleges through application consultancy and candidacy building.
  5. U.S. News & World Report is a big, multi-platform, publisher of news and information about education, career, and employment. It is known for the rankings it presents for Best Colleges, Best Graduate Schools, Best Law Schools, Best Medical Schools, and specific programs within those more general categories. Aside from these, the website features blogs, interview texts, and other useful information about college application and admissions that can help aspiring college students get into the school they prefer the most. 
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How Much Does Medical School Cost?

Posted by InGenius Prep on Mon, Nov 10, 2014 @ 14:11 PM

Getting into medical school requires mental and emotional preparation, as well as financial readiness. Med school is expensive, and everyone who wants to be a doctor knows this. If, despite the looming financial burden and the premed critics you will face, you are still thinking about applying to med school, below is a summary of the financial cost of attending medical school. Proceed with caution... 

Medical School Tuition

According to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the median tuition in 2013-2014 was $31,783 for resident students at public institutions, $55,294 for non-resident students at public institutions, $52,093 for resident students at private med schools, and $50,476 for non-resident students at private med schools. These figures do not include health insurance, housing, and other expenses. 

So, for four years of medical school, a public school would cost $127,132 for resident students and $221,176 for non-resident students. At private schools, the entire cost of medical education totals $208,372 for resident students and $201,904 for non-resident students.

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How Many Medical Schools Should I Apply To?

Posted by InGenius Prep on Fri, Oct 24, 2014 @ 12:10 PM

So, you have decided to go to medical school. You rocked your premed program, strengthened your CV, and passed the MCAT with flying colors. You now reach the moment to decide where to submit your applications and how many medical schools should you apply to.

Deciding which medical school to apply to is an extremely important part of the application process. Moreover, it can really be challenging, expensive, and time consuming. Not only do you need to identify which schools will be able to provide you with your academic needs and educational expectations, but you will also have to match your qualifications with the school’s standards. 

Considerations when Applying to Medical School

  1. Applying to med school costs a lot of money. The AMCAS costs $160 for the first application, and $33 for succeeding applications. Thus, applying to ten schools will cost you $457 for the AMCAS application alone. In addition, you will also have to submit secondary applications that often times cost money, too. Expect to pay at least $150 for secondary applications. 
  2. Applying to med school can be time consuming. After submitting your AMCAS application, it can take several weeks for your application to be verified and released to the schools you have applied to. The hard work continues when you are expected to complete your secondary applications, which require new essays, forms, and documents to be submitted. Finally, the interview process will also take a lot of your time and energy.
  3. You can never be too sure about your applications to med school, as acceptance rates are extremely low. With this in mind, make sure that you submit your applications to a good number of medical schools to guarantee that you will get into one, including reach schools, safety schools, and fit schools. While you want to attend a top-tier medical school, as everyone else does, it is smart to have a fall back option in case you will not make it.

So, How Many Medical Schools Should You Apply to?

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How to Get Financial Aid for Medical School

Posted by InGenius Prep on Thu, Oct 09, 2014 @ 12:10 PM

Medical school is expensive. When applying, you have to be mentally prepared for the financial burden that attending medical school will place on your life. So, how much does medical school cost? Let’s find out...

Medical School Tuition and Fees 

In 2013–2014, the average cost of med school tuition and fees at public schools was approximately $31,783 for in-state residents and $55,294 for non-residents. At private schools, the average annual tuition and fees was approximately $52,093 for residents and $50,476 for non-resident students. These figures discuss tuition alone and don’t even include health insurance, housing, books, and the cost of being out of the workforce. 

According to Julie Fresne, the director of student and resident deb management services at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), with such an immense cost of attending medical school, the median debt level for a graduating medical student is approximately $175,000 while 25% of graduating medical school students have debt exceeding $200,000.

These numbers can truly be discouraging. However, aspiring medical students should know that there are many resources to help manage your money, get financial aid, and to pay for medical school. 

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Top 5 Dos and Don'ts to ACE Your Medical School Interview

Posted by Admissions Helpers on Thu, Oct 02, 2014 @ 13:10 PM

This article is a guest post written by Admissions Helpers.

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The Advantages and Disadvantages of Going to Medical School

Posted by InGenius Prep on Thu, Sep 25, 2014 @ 13:09 PM

For children, it is very easy to answer “doctor” when asked what they want to be when they grow up. While their intentions are pure and honest, their innocence blinds them from the fact that becoming a doctor is extremely challenging. 

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The Med School Application Timeline: From MCAT to Interview Prep

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Thu, Aug 14, 2014 @ 09:08 AM

This is a guest blog post from our friends at InGenius Prep

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Tags: medical school applications, MCAT prep strategies, med school application timing

Medical School: 5 Moves that Will Get You On the Right Track

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Mon, Jan 13, 2014 @ 14:01 PM

If you are thinking about going to med school, congratulations. You are to be admired for aiming so high and taking on a challenging field with many rewards. You'll need to be completely committed and driven to achieve your goals.  Certainly, scoring in the 75th percentile or higher on the MCAT will be critical. However, there are a variety of others things you can and should start doing today to prepare.

Start out by taking 5 moves that will get you on the right track today.

1. Hit the Books

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Putting Together a Med School Application That Gets Noticed

Posted by Mark Skoskiewicz on Tue, Jan 07, 2014 @ 12:01 PM

More than 600,000 people submitted applications to med school last year, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). Contrast that to the almost 20,000 medical students who graduated in 2012, and you can easily see how difficult getting into med school is. It's vital you and your application stand out from the crowd. These tips will give you the best chance of being considered among the thousands that get reviewed.

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6 Ways to Use an MCAT Tutor to Boost Your MCAT Score

Posted by Nasya Mendoza on Thu, Aug 01, 2013 @ 11:08 AM

1. Objective Evaluation of Readiness to Embark on the MCAT Odyssey

The first thing that you need to do before you even start to do anything committing for the MCAT is evaluate whether or not you are ready right now.  While some say that you may take the MCAT more than one time (up to two or three), it is not recommended.  Depending on the school and rigor, schools may take your best individual sections as your score, or average out the scores, or take the lowest score, no matter what.  So in the end, you want to take the MCAT once, and a knockout once.  Read as much as you can about the MCAT and what it entails to prepare for it.  Also worth evaluating is if a career medicine is what you like.  If you are gritting your teeth down for studying because “you really don’t like to study,” then maybe a career spent studying, even after graduation, is not the best for you.  Evaluate if you have what it takes, because us tutors here do not want you to waste your resources, time, and effort on anything.

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