ACT & SAT Prep and College Admissions Blog

Gaurav Dubey

Gaurav earned a Bachelors in Biology and Philosophy with minors in Chemistry and Mathematics from the University of Miami. He also holds a Masters in Biotechnology from Rush University. Gaurav is a passionate scientist and educator who specializes in tutoring STEM subjects and test prep.

Recent Posts

ACT Science: Sifting Out What Matters (and what doesn’t)

Posted by Gaurav Dubey on Thu, Mar 16, 2017 @ 10:00 AM

The ACT Science section has a rather misleading name. Perhaps a better name would be the ACT Reading Section Part 2: Science Concepts. The exam requires no prior knowledge of scientific content or concepts. Instead, students are required to interpret data graphs, what the scientific method is and how scientific theories disagree from each other. These are concepts taught in every high school in the country. The ACT is a standardized exam that must provide a level playing field for all applicants, from all demographics across the United States. As such, it may be comforting to know that advanced science concepts such as DNA transcription and translation or the Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium won’t be tested. To succeed on this portion of the exam, exposure to ACT Science questions and practice solving them is critical. The following is an important tip to succeeding on the ACT science section:

Read More

Topics: ACT, ACT/SAT study skills, ACT Science

ACT Math: A Lesson on Logarithms

Posted by Gaurav Dubey on Tue, Feb 07, 2017 @ 05:25 PM

What are logs in math? Do you use them to develop a foundation and build like beavers do? No, you don’t. Instead, in math, logs are the “opposite” of exponentials, just as subtraction is the opposite of addition. If I asked you what number (x) to the third power equals 8 (x3 = 8), then you would take the cube root of both sides and tell me the cube root of 8 equals 2.

Now consider this: if I asked you 2 raised to what power (x) gets you 8, how would you solve it? Well, we know that x=3 because 23 = 8, as we saw from the previous problem. But what steps would you take to solve this problem, or any others like it? As I mentioned before, logs are the “opposite”, or the inverse, of exponentials. Thus, one operation can undo the other. Let’s take a look at the relationship between them.

Read More

Topics: ACT math, ACT-Math practice, logs in ACT-Math